Inhaled corticosteroids potency table

Oral and injectable systemic corticosterois are steroid hormones prescribed to decrease inflammation in diseases and conditions such as arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, for example), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, asthma, bronchitis, some skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions that involve the nose and eyes. Examples of systemic corticosteroids include hydrocortisone (Cortef), cortisone, prednisone (Prednisone Intensol), prednisolone (Orapred, Prelone), and methylprednisolone (Medrol, Depo-Medrol, Solu-Medrol). Some of the side effects of systemic corticosteroids are swelling of the legs, hypertension, headache, easy bruising, facial hair growth, diabetes, cataracts, and puffiness of the face.

There have been no randomized trials examining the effect of hydrocortisone given after the first week of life or used to treat infants with prolonged ventilator dependence. One retrospective cohort study compared infants who required assisted ventilation and oxygen after the first one to two weeks of age and received hydrocortisone with a group of healthier infants who did not receive hydrocortisone. [27] Infants treated with hydrocortisone experienced decreasing oxygen requirements and were successfully weaned from assisted ventilation. After seven days of treatment, there were no differences in oxygen requirements between the two groups. On follow-up, there were no differences in head circumference, neurological outcome, psychomotor development or school performance. Magnetic resonance imaging performed at eight years of age on a similar cohort of infants treated with hydrocortisone showed that although, overall, children born preterm had significantly reduced grey matter volumes compared to term children, there were no differences in the intracranial volumes, grey matter volumes or white matter volumes between children who did and did not receive hydrocortisone for treatment of CLD. [28] There were also no differences in neurocognitive outcomes, assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children.

To reduce swelling and tightness in their airways, some children with asthma are treated for months or years with an oral corticosteroid, such as prednisone. Others may be treated with a short “burst” of an oral corticosteroid for five to seven days. A burst is prescribed in an emergency situation when asthma severity markedly intensifies. While corticosteroids are known to suppress immune function, children receiving oral corticosteroid treatment rarely have complications from chickenpox.

There is no evidence that an inhaled corticosteroid poses an increased risk for children with asthma who are exposed to chickenpox. Inhaled corticosteroids are used for long-term relief of symptoms and reduce the need for extra medicine, such as oral steroids.

Inhaled corticosteroids potency table

inhaled corticosteroids potency table

Media:

inhaled corticosteroids potency tableinhaled corticosteroids potency tableinhaled corticosteroids potency tableinhaled corticosteroids potency tableinhaled corticosteroids potency table

http://buy-steroids.org